Radical Retirement Communities - Bali

By Jean Sutherland

If you've retired anywhere outside the US, you've done the Radical Retirement. Disbelief from family and friends is proof enough. Today people everywhere are opting for radical retirement.

Take Bali for instance. Bali's weather is tropical with the warm ocean waters that you'd expect to find. There's a landscape of rice paddies at the bottom of volcanoes, an eclectic local culture and miles of extraordinarily beautiful beaches.

Exploring Bali will lead you to over 10,000 Hindu temples. Balinese music plays everywhere at night accompanied by dancing. The island has an active arts and craft scene and the best shopping and prices in Asia.

A cute 2 storey house with small plunge pool, 2 bedrooms, AC and 2 baths will cost you approx. $600+ US. a month. Apts. are even cheaper.

There are approx. 20,000 foreigners living in Bali, with a high concentration on the southern coast from Sanur to Seminyak and in the center of the island, in Ubud. The Ubud expatriates are for the most part artists, traders, and businessmen and women who offer services to tourists and the expatriate community.

People who live in Bali tend to be people who let life lead them rather than trying to control it. The Balinese don't have a word for future -they don't think about tomorrow the way we do. Sound familiar?

Expatriates living in Indonesia, have the unique advantage of being within a few hours flight or drive from beautiful pristine beaches, towering volcanic mountains, verdant rain forest, wildlife refugees and fascinating cultural experiences. All the normal activities such as golf, tennis and scuba driving are also available. The expatriate community is well organized and very sophisticate with many of the activities and groups you would find in most communities.

When it comes to medical needs there are many small hospitals throughout the island and serious medical needs are usually referred to Jakarta. There are many public hospitals but you can also find many private hospitals. Medical coverage from private insurers is recommended.

One usually enters Bali with a temporary 30 day visa and it's a long and winding road to obtain a longer stay visa. One is advised to seek professional help to work your way through the immigration maze.

Rachel Greaves, offers this advise to those considering this expatriate community. Make friends with the local people, learn the language, acknowledge the dangers, take care on the roads, accept the things you canĚt change, embrace the challenges, explore the island and the culture, and be open to the intense spiritual energy here. Bali is full of magic and wonder, if you truly want to be here you will find a way to make it work. There are a lot of lessons to be learned on the way, but if you have a passion for Bali, the joy and rewards of living here are immeasurable.

If you would like website references for more information, please email me. I would enjoy your comments and recommendations for other expatriate destinations to feature. webmaster@retireresource.com

About the Author

Jean Sutherland is a retired freelance author who has lived in Mexico for 3 years and runs the popular retirement website Retire Resources at http://www.retireresource.com